NV Marc Hébrart ‘Mes Favorites’ Vieilles Vignes Brut Champagne

$75

75% Pinot Noir and 25% Chardonnay from the Vallée de la Marne.

This bottling is from Jean-Paul’s (the winemaker) favorite parcel in Mareuil and is intended as a tribute to its terroir. This Champagne has a noble, Pinot Noir fragrance, leading to an utter masterpiece of weightless concentration. It has juiciness, minerality, lift, structure and length. It’s the perfect balance and could age another 15 years.

Pair with Pistachio-Crusted Scallops, oysters or a light chicken dish.

    Pairs with
  • RP 93

In Stock At our temperature controlled facility in Costa Mesa, CA

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Champagne, France

Champagne, the place where their reputation is as respected as their wines. This prestigious region is home to some of the most premium sparkling wines in the world. Champagne is a province located in the northeast of France, just a few hours from the big city of Paris. Due to having a cool and continental climate, frost can be one of the biggest challenges here. To minimize frost, you’ll find that the vineyards are planted on slopes and have well-draining chalk soil. Within the region, there is only one appellation, Champagne AC. Although, there are 5 main sub-regions: Montagne de Reims, Vallée de la Marne, Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne, and Côte des Bar, and many premier cru and grand cru villages. Champagne producers are known to be committed to sustainable agriculture lessening the using of many fertilizers and pesticides. Fun fact: You’ll often hear many people call sparkling wine from other regions, Champagne, but the term Champagne can solely be used if the wine comes from this region only.

There are three main grape varietals used in winemaking: Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier. These grapes are used to make wine in the traditional method, meaning they will undergo a second fermentation in the bottle to be later sold. It is a technique often used for premium sparkling wines, but can be costly (for consumers as well) and time-consuming. Champagne can come in a range of quality levels and style all varying flavors, sweetness, and levels of aging. Brut (dry) Champagne is by far the most popular. Non-vintage wines, using wine from different years, can be lighter in body with more fresh fruit flavors than those of specific vintage wines. Vintage wines are likely to be from the best growing years and parcels of grapes, but not always! Keep your eyes peeled for the increasing trend of Brut Nature Champagne, this means no added sugar and is the driest style of Champagne. 

Jean-Paul Hébrart took over the operations of Marc Hébrart Champagne in the Vallée de la Marne from his father Marc in 1997. This estate is not exactly new: Jean-Paul’s father has been producing champagne under the Marc Hébrart name since 1964 and has been a member of the Special Club since 1985. Hébrart farms 14 hectares of vines on 65 different sites in 6 villages: the 1er cru vineyards of Mareuil-sur-Aÿ, Avenay, Val d’Or and Bisseuil and the grand crus villages of Aÿ as well as Chouilly and Oiry in the Côte des Blancs. Each parcel is always vinified separately in glass lined stainless steel and ceramic tanks. He is slowly phasing out the ceramic as it is more difficult to control the temperature. Hébrart is also experimenting barrel fermentation and indigenous yeast fermentation for some of his older vine parcels.

Using these new techniques Jean-Paul has made an alternative Téte de Cuvee (2004 vintage dated) called Rive Gauche-Rive Droite, named for the sites on both sides of the Marne that comprise of the blend. These old vine parcels are fermented and aged in 205 liter four year old barrique (without battonage) before being bottled sur latté. Jean-Paul hand selects grapes, uses a Bucher press, and is experimenting with fermentation in petite cuvee. Hébrart doesn’t block malolactic fermentation and does all remuage by hand.

Peter Liem writes of Champagne Hébrart on Champgneguide.net: “Hébrart’s wines have a broad appeal: if you like to think about your wines, they’re intellectually engaging enough to satisfy you; on the other hand, if you’re just looking to drink, they’re simply delicious. The wines are full and generous without being weighty, complex and soil-driven without being demanding. Overall, the entire range is of consistently high quality, and represents excellent value for the money.”

Undeniably, Mareuil should belong to the grand cru villages. Most of the vineyards reach almost the same quality as those of Aÿ. In their youth, what may distinguish a Mareuil wine from an Aÿ wine is a hawthorn-like flowery bouquet. On aging, the wines become practically impossible to tell apart. -Richard Juhlin, 4000 Champagnes

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